Author Bios

Old Town

Old Town has been successfully building boats for over 100 years. Our heritage helps us to move forward with new ideas and ways of improving our product line. We are paddlers who want to create designs that we would want to paddle. We take our sport seriously and believe that even the newest most recreational paddler should be able to paddle boats with performing hulls and creature comforts. You’ll hear from our R&D Team (research and development) as they share insightful innovations and sneak peeks of our new products. You will also hear from our Marketing Team, who will provide previews of exciting promotions and upcoming kayaking events.

Blog Posts From This Author

All Authors

  • Holy Man Adventures 54x54
    Holy Man Adventures
    Mark, Jeff, Jon, Ben, and Dave share their two-month journey through blog posts and photos.
  • Ken Whiting 54x54
    Ken Whiting
    Ken Whiting is one of the most influential and respected paddlers in the world, and was recognized as such by Paddler Magazine as one of their 'Paddlers of the Century.'
  • Old Town 54x54
    Old Town
    The Old Town bloggers are comprised of experts in their respective fields at the company.
  • Denny Lange 54x54
    Denny Lange
    Denny Lange is an avid canoeist and kayaker who started paddling early in childhood.
  • Benson Gray 54x54
    Benson Gray
    Benson Gray grew up in Old Town and has always loved old canoes. His work with computers, along with an interest in the history of canoe builders, has led to some interesting collaborations.

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YOUR OLD TOWN ADVENTURES

Boy Saves Deer During Kayak Trip on the Tobique River
boydeer1It was as happy an ending as the beloved Walt Disney story of Bambi when an 11 year old boy rescued a newborn deer trapped in mud along a river in northern New Brunswick, Canada. Benjamin Thibodeau was on a camping trip in Riley Brook earlier this summer when he spotted a small animal sticking out of the water along the Tobique River. From his Old Town kayak, he could see a little head, ears and some white sots. He thought it might be a baby deer. The boy called to his father; who was on shore, and quickly paddled over to the animal. When he reached the banks of the river; he saw the deer was up to his belly in mud, its four spindly legs buried deep along the bank. With no leverage to free itself, it couldn't move. Wasting very little time Benjamin pulled the deer out of the mud and then with the help of his father moved it to safety. Happily, the next morning both of them woke up to the sight of the deer standing outside the door of their tent with its mother and sibling.